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The power of social activism + neural science.

Dr. Anne Beaumanoir was a human rights activist and clinical neuropsychologist/neurologist in France during World War II. Her parents were activists who appreciated education, science, and research as tools to help improve daily lives. Her mother, the milkmaid daughter of an organic farmer, and her father who owned a bicycle shop, were both shunned by…

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The psychology of eating chocolate bunnies (A tongue in cheek abstract). Or, ear in cheek.

Abstract This retrospective observational analysis hypothesizes that an increase occurs in online reports and images of auricular amputations of confectionary rabbits during the spring, particularly in April. Using the online search engine Google, social media content, anecdotal data, case studies, and visual portrayals of confectionary rabbits, an uptick in auricular amputations from 2018 to 2022…

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Making a Nest

A client tells me after going hard all week, she retreats on Friday evenings to a corner of her sectional sofa. She dons her softest hoodie and brings with her a favorite pillow, fuzzy blanket, books, warm beverage, journal, pens, aromatherapy candle, headphones, and healthy snacks. Often, her dog joins her. During the tumult of…

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strategies for self-care

Ancestors; an appreciation

Mahmudah (Urdu), meaning: One of glory; worthy of praise. It is the death anniversary of my darling Dado, my paternal grandmother, Mahmudah. The kindest, most dignified, calm soul I have known. Born in India before Partition, she had a difficult life. Following an arranged marriage, she raised six children with grace and deep love. Although…

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Diabetes and Mental Health

37.3 million Americans—about 1 in 10—have diabetes. About 1 in 5 people with diabetes don’t know they have it. 96 million American adults—more than 1 in 3—have prediabetes. More than 8 in 10 adults with prediabetes don’t know they have it. For the past three years, approximately 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed…

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Generalrace and mental health

The Psychology of Pranking

Psychologists have studied pranks for years. Humor, in general, is good for us. Neuropsychology research has shown that laughing improves well-being. Humor and laughter release endorphins and oxytocin, neurochemicals that are associated with happiness and social bonding. But why are practical jokes or pranks even funny in the first place? From clinical psychology, a summary…

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The power of friendship

Ella Fitzgerald and Marilyn Monroe: two incredible and talented women who formed what was considered to be an unlikely friendship in the turbulent early 1950s. However, they had a lot in common. Both had experienced difficult childhoods punctuated by poverty, abuse, assault, neglect, and lack of stability, as well as a determination and courage to…

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The importance of Uncles and Aunts

My uncle taught me how to salsa and dance the Latin hustle, took me to my first rock concert, taught me how to drive stick though I turned his hair gray and ground his gears, provided a shoulder for heartbreak tears when my parents divorced, listened to to my romantic travails, watched my favorite television…

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Embolden Psychology
Embolden

Embolden offers the ADOS-2, the gold standard assessment for kids on the spectrum.

Combined with psychoeducational testing, it helps provide comprehensive information and recommendations to help children and teens six and up.

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