Category Archives: Covid-19 Crisis

How to help a loved one with depression

Depression doesn’t happen in a vacuum. It causes a ripple effect that touches everyone surrounding the person. Family members and friends often feel helpless, not knowing how to reach out or what to do to help their suffering loved one.

It would be nice if the depressed person could specifically vocalize their needs, so that friends and families knew exactly what to say and do. However, the paradox of depression can be immobility and lack of motivation. Vegetative symptoms are disturbances of a person’s functions necessary to maintain life. These disturbances are most commonly seen in mood disorders, and are part of the diagnostic criteria for depression.

Vegetative symptoms in a patient with typical depression include:
Weight loss and anorexia (loss of appetite) or overeating
Insomnia or hypersomnia.
Fatigue and low energy
Inattention and memory problems
Poor communication

1. Educate Yourself About Depression and Other Mood Disorders.
You may not be able to cure your loved one. But you can better understand their condition by educating yourself about depression or mood disorder. Reading up on your loved one’s illness will help you feel more in control of the situation and give you more patience to tolerate the confusing or frustrating symptoms.

2. Ask Open-ended Questions
Do not go in with the attitude that you know better, and you know what’s going to work to help them feel better. Listen to their personal experience.

3. Help Them Identify and Cope With Sources of Life Stress
It’s no secret that stress is a significant contributor to depression. Chronic levels of stress pour cortisol into your bloodstream and cause inflammation in your nervous system and every other biological system. In a study in Scientific Reports, a neuroscience journal, stress was shown to reduce the brain’s innate ability to keep itself healthy. The hippocampus, which regulates mood, shrinks, negatively impacting our short-term memory function and learning abilities.

4. Remind Them That They’re Incredibly Strong
When you’re depressed, you don’t believe that you’re worthy of love. I call this the secret symptom of depression, the feeling that you are unimportant and don’t matter in the universe. That’s what makes relationships and communication so difficult. One way of helping is by reminding them of their strengths. Use concrete examples. Cite times in their lives they exemplified courage, stamina, compassion, integrity, and perseverance. One colleague of mine will say, remember your name, who are you?

In a series of studies that I conducted at the Catholic University of America, in Washington, DC, I found that people with depression literally do not remember positive aspects of a singular activity. For example, when shown movies that had a range of affect from joyful to traumatic, the more painful and traumatic memories in the films were later most remembered on memory tasks given to individuals identified as depressed.

5. Make Them Smile, Because Laughter Helps.
Humor can help us heal from a number of illnesses, including depression. In Darkness Visible, the writer William Styron described his journey through severe depression. Humor was one of the things that helped him survive. Watch a favorite show or listen to a shared podcast with your depressed loved one. You don’t have to fake laughter, let it emerge on its own.

6. Let Them Know They Won’t Always Feel This Way.
This is a powerful message. When combined with helping them remember past struggles that they mastered, it shows that there is hope.

7. If You Do Only One Thing, Let It Be Listening
Listen. Suspend all judgments, save all interjections … don’t be a know it all. Do nothing more than make excellent eye contact, reflect on what you are hearing, and open your ears. It’s the most powerful wisdom.

Mental health and Corona

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly one in five of U.S. adults (47 million) reported having a mental illness in the past year, and over 11 million had a serious mental illness, which frequently results in functional impairment and limits life activities. Please remember that these are only the reported numbers, because many people do not seek help or endorse symptoms.

The COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic recession have negatively affected many people’s mental health and created new barriers for people already suffering from mental illness and substance use disorders, who were previously substantial in number. In polls conducted in mid-July, 53% of adults in the United States reported that their mental health has been negatively impacted due to worry and stress over the coronavirus. This is significantly higher than the 32% reported in March. Many adults are also reporting specific negative impacts on their mental health and wellbeing, such as difficulty sleeping (36%) or eating (32%), increases in alcohol consumption or substance use (12%), and worsening chronic conditions (12%), due to worry and stress over the coronavirus. As the pandemic wears on, ongoing and necessary public health measures expose many people to experiencing situations linked to poor mental health outcomes, such as isolation, health worries, evictions, and job loss.

Some takeaways:
A broad body of research links social isolation and loneliness to poor mental health, and data from late March shows that significantly higher shares of people who were sheltering in place (47%) reported negative mental health effects resulting from worry or stress related to coronavirus. In particular, isolation and loneliness during the pandemic may present specific mental health risks for households with adolescents and for older adults. The share of older adults (ages 65 and up) reporting negative mental health impacts has very significantly increased since March. Polling data shows that women with children under the age of 18 are more likely to report major negative mental health impacts than their male counterparts.

Research also shows that job loss is associated with increased depression, anxiety, distress, and low self-esteem and may lead to higher rates of substance use disorder and suicide. Recent polling data shows that more than half of the people who lost income or employment reported negative mental health impacts from worry or stress over coronavirus; and lower income people reported much higher rates of major negative mental health impacts compared to higher income people.

Poor mental health due to burnout among front-line workers and increased anxiety or mental illness among those with poor physical health are also concerns. Those with mental illness and substance use disorders pre-pandemic, and those newly affected, will likely require mental health and substance use services. The pandemic spotlights both existing and new barriers to accessing mental health and substance use disorder services.

In my practice, many people do not have access to consistent Wi-Fi or Internet service. During this unprecedented time of uncertainty and fear, it is likely that mental health issues and substance use disorders among people with these conditions will be exacerbated.

Embolden remains dedicated to providing access and services for medical professionals and front line personnel. The long-term effects that we are experiencing cannot be minimized.

How to help a loved one who is having mental health problems

We all go through tough times and people help us through them. Other times we have been worried about other people’s mental health. Whether they are a friend, family member, significant other, neighbor, or colleague, there are many ways to support somebody you care about.

1 in 6 people experienced a common mental health problem such as anxiety or depression in the past week.

Talking about mental health
If you are worried about someone it can be difficult to know what to do. When you are aware there is an issue, it is important not to wait. One of the saddest components of depression is that it is immobilizing. You can simultaneously know that you desperately need help, and have absolutely no energy or desire to seek it.

Waiting and hoping others will come to you for help might lose valuable time in getting them support. Openly talking with someone is often the first step to take when you know they are going through a hard time. This way you can find out what is troubling them and what you can do to help.

Eight tips for talking about mental health:

  1. Set time aside with no distractions. It is important to provide an open and non-judgemental space.
  2. Let them share as much or as little as they want to. Let them lead the discussion at their own pace. Don’t put pressure on them to tell you anything they aren’t ready to talk about. Talking can take a lot of trust and courage. You might be the first person they have been able to talk to about this.
  3. Don’t try to diagnose or second guess their feelings. You probably aren’t a medical expert and, while you may be happy to talk and offer support, you aren’t a trained counsellor. Try not to make assumptions about what is wrong or jump in too quickly with your own diagnosis or solutions.
  4. Keep questions open ended. Say “Why don’t you tell me how you are feeling?” rather than “I can see you are feeling very low”. Try to keep your language neutral. Give the person time to answer and try not to grill them with too many questions.
  5. Talk about wellbeing. Exercise, having a healthy diet and taking a break can help protect mental health and sustain wellbeing. Talk about ways of de-stressing and ask if they find anything helpful.
  6. Listen carefully to what they tell you. Repeat what they have said back to them to ensure you have understood it. You don’t have to agree with what they are saying, but by showing you understand how they feel, you are letting them know you respect their feelings.
  7. Offer them help in seeking professional support and provide information on ways to do this.
  8. Know your limits. If you believe they are in immediate danger or they have incurred injuries that need medical attention, you need to take action to make sure they are safe. More details on dealing in a crisis can be found below.

How do I respond in a crisis?

People with mental health problems sometimes experience a crisis, such as breaking down in tears, having a panic attack, feeling suicidal, or experiencing a different sense of reality (dissociation). This may include even losing a sense of time and place. You may feel a sense of crisis too, in response, but it’s important to stay calm yourself.

There are some general strategies that you can use to help:

    • Listen without making judgements and concentrate on their needs in that moment.
    • Ask them what would help them.
    • Reassure and help point them to practical information or resources.
    • Avoid confrontation.
    • Ask if there is someone they would like you to contact.
    • Encourage them to seek appropriate professional help.
    • If they have hurt themselves, make sure they get the first aid they need.

Seeing, hearing or believing things that no-one else does can be the symptom of a mental health problem. It can be frightening and upsetting. Gently remind the person who you are and why you are there. Under extreme stress, people can dissociate. Don’t reinforce or dismiss their experiences, but acknowledge how the symptoms are making them feel.

How do I respond if someone is suicidal?
If someone tells you they are feeling suicidal or can’t go on, or if you suspect they are thinking of taking their own life, it is very important to encourage them to get help.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
Hours: Available 24 hours. Languages: English and Spanish
1-800-273-8255

Executive functioning and COVID-19

Many of you are excellent teachers, and probably didn’t know it. I’m a clinical psychologist of 23 years with a neural science background, and I have worked with children and teens every one of those years. I have literally met and spoken in detail with thousands of children and families. They are MY teachers.

When you show your kids that they, and you, don’t wear masks, don’t social distance, hang out in public places, pick fun over health, and disregard safety of others,  you are teaching LOTS. 

  • Rules don’t apply to you.
  • Impulse control doesn’t matter, do what YOU wanna do.
  • Being uncomfortable, physically or emotionally, is just too hard.
  • Fun before safety.
  • Others don’t matter, it’s about you.
  • You are healthy right now, so why worry. 
  • Emerging research doesn’t matter; it’s changing anyway, so it’s irrelevant.
  • Uncertainty is unbearable.
  • Everyone else is doing it, so why not.

Unfortunately, children with their developing frontal lobes do not apply these rules, which are aspects of executive functioning, to a single situation. They are generalized and integrated at the neuronal level. They are learning, growing beings.

[“But Doctor, Junior will not follow basic household rules. They only think about themselves. And she goes out every weekend and does risky things. It’s so frustrating.”]

Um. 

Obviously, there are many families working hard, and I mean hard, to keep others and themselves safe. I know it’s not easy, I hear from you every day. Big respect. There are also creative solutions. May you all have a healthy summer and fall.

Parenting Tips for Homeschooling

As homeschooling seems to stretch endlessly for many families, certainly school districts try to provide guidance and curriculum. These are some tips offered by my offices to ease the course. And even make it enjoyable.

Establish structure
The success of homeschooling depends on your willingness to commit to a structure and a schedule and your willingness to be on top of it. I have families maintain a large calendar, or even whiteboard, that has all the family activities on it, to be able to see them at a single glance. This includes outdoor activities, family time, special events, social commitments, downtime (described below), class time, and, of course, homework. Homeschooling is not just about schoolwork.

Use available resources

  • KhanAcademy.org has also added new features and functionality as a result of the pandemic, including daily learning schedules for children ages 2 to 18.
  • thinkwell.com offers classes for homeschoolers taught by acclaimed professors in subjects ranging from high school and Advanced Placement mathematics and science to American Government, Economics, History and even public speaking.
  • audible.com has free books for kids.
  • math-drills.com has free math sheets for kids

Model the value of dealing with uncertainty.
At Embolden, we call this emotion coaching. The pandemic, so often referred to as unprecedented times, really is. Mental flexibility is a hallmark of executive functioning, and incredibly valuable as a life tool. Teaching and discussing as a family how to deal with not knowing is invaluable.

Change your expectations.
Things are not the same. Expecting a similar level, duration, or output of work is unrealistic. Set the kids up to enjoy the experience. Before worrying that you or your child are underperforming, remember that having and maintaining close emotional connections with kids during this time is a priority.

Play
Free time, is an incredible stress reducer for children, and so is outdoor time. One family I know it takes a family walk most evenings of the week. Parents have told me that kids really open up to them on these outings. Another option is quiet time, an hour away everyone has to entertain themselves, whether they choose to read, play games, or even text with friends.

Encourage fun chores
Homeschooling is not just about school. I have many of the kids I work with plan a menu or recipe, make the grocery list, and make a meal for the family once a week. Other kids and teens I work with enjoy working in the garden with parents or family, or taking care of indoor plants. Start with less demanding tasks, and reinforce the importance of a family home and all its members.

Be easy on yourself. And them.
It’s important to remember that homeschooling isn’t going to be perfect. It’s a stressful time for both you and your child. Teachers, parents, and students have all noted in studies, that it can be hard, and even tiring. So if you need to put on a movie to get through the afternoon, or call it quits for the day, that’s okay.

Movement
Stretching, walking around, playing with a furry family companion, and even going outside for short breaks have all been shown to increase concentration. 

On pandemic and homeschooling

Several of my local school systems as well as private schools in my work in Maryland, Virginia, and Washington DC have made it known that they are going to have a very limited schedule or no in vivo teaching this fall.

I work with many parents and educators. It’s been an incredibly difficult process, since March, to parent, work from home, do home schooling, manage health concerns, and still try to have quality of life and self care.

I have the deepest respect for the challenges involved. But it’s essential to help children feel safe, keep healthy routines, manage their behavior and build resilience.

Here are some tips to help your children feel safe.
– Address children’s fears directly
Children rely on their parents for safety, both physical and emotional. Reassure your children that you are there for them and that your family will get through this together.

-Answer questions about the pandemic simply & honestly. Talk with children about any frightening news they hear or see. It is OK to say people are getting sick or passing, but say following rules like hand washing and staying home will help your family stay healthy. Explain to them why they may not be able to see their friends easily in a calm fashion. Making things seem like they are falsely positive it’s not helpful for children, because they will know that there is something wrong

-Recognize your child’s feelings. Calmly say, for example, “I can see that you are upset because you can’t have your friends over.” Guiding questions can help older children and teens work through issues. (“I know it is disappointing not to be able to hang with your friends easily right now. How do you think you can stay in touch with them?”)

-Keep in touch with loved ones, friends, and family. Children may also worry about a grandparent or family member who is living alone or a relative or friend with an increased risk of getting COVID-19. Video chats can help ease their anxiety

-Model how to manage feelings. Dr. Siddique calls this emotion coaching. Just like a coach can help you be a better athlete or student, emotions also require practice, feedback, and implementation.

Talk through how you are managing your own feelings. (“I am worried about Grandma or Auntie, since I can’t go visit her. The best I can do is to check in with her more often by phone. I will put a reminder on my phone to call her in the morning and the afternoon until this outbreak ends.”

-Acknowledge compromises. Yes, working from home is hard. I have to make a lot of adjustments. I know mommy is in the study all the time. It’s like being at the office but now it’s here at home. Sometimes when I’m here in the house, I can’t always talk to you. But we will have our time later.

-Tell your child before you leave the house for work or essential errands. In a calm and reassuring voice, tell them where you are going, how long you will be gone, when you will return, and that you are taking steps to stay safe. More than ever, communication matters.

-Look forward with realistic optimism. Tell them that scientists are working hard to figure out how to help people who get ill, and that things will get better.

-Offer extra hugs and say “I love you” more often. Being affectionate matters.

-Keep healthy routines
During the pandemic, it is more important than ever to maintain bedtime and other routines. They create a sense of order to the day that offers reassurance in a very uncertain time. All children, including teens, benefit from routines that are predictable yet flexible enough to meet individual needs. go to bed within a certain time range and wake up at the same time. Model that unfortunate times do not have to create chaos.

-Structure. With the usual routines thrown off, establish new daily schedules. Break up schoolwork and chores when possible. Older children and teens can help with schedules, but they should follow a general order, such as:
Wake-up routines, getting dressed, breakfast and some active play in the morning, followed by quiet play and snack to transition into schoolwork.
Lunch, chores, exercise, some online social time with friends, and then homework in the afternoon.

-As recommended by Dr. Siddique: Fun, food, and family time before bed.
Chat, play, read, or watch a great show. How you complete the day sets the stage for the next one.

-Avoid any physical punishment. Per pediatric research: Spanking, hitting, and other forms of physical or “corporal” punishment risks injury and isn’t effective in any scientific study. Physical punishment can increase aggression in children over time, fails to teach them to behave or practice self-control, and can even interfere with normal brain development. Corporal punishment may take away a child’s sense of safety and security at home, which are especially needed now. They can also manifest and difficult or unhealthy relationships in the future, because people who love you can hurt you.

-Neuropsychology research: Embolden reminds parents and caregivers never to shake or jerk a child, which could cause permanent injuries and disabilities and even result in death.

-Self care. Caregivers also should be sure to take care of themselves physically: eat healthy, exercise, and get enough sleep. Find ways to decompress and take breaks. If more than one parent is home, take turns watching the children, if possible.

Reopening: Community Mental Health Clinic

Dear Friends:

This week, I reopened the community mental health clinic I’ve been running for over 18 years, started by my previous beloved mentor, Dr. Neil Schiff. We have been closed since March for safety reasons. I am indebted to the community in Washington DC and Maryland for giving me the trust that they have all of these years. As we maintain extreme precautions, I am also grateful for again seeing the local community that I care for deeply.

While gratitude helps me through each day, my gratitude is tempered with outrage. Longstanding and deeply rooted health care inequities—based on race, ethnicity, and income—have been thrown into relief by the COVID-19 pandemic that cannot be minimized. Everyone is suffering, but communities of color are suffering more. The shortcomings of our system with respect to caring for the elderly are painfully visible. The risks associated with incarceration are vivid. While none of these problems originated with this pandemic, the crisis has exacerbated these injustices in devastating and tragic ways.

I am striving in joining with others to do the urgent work needed to dismantle the barriers to health that persist for so many. As you know, while this has been a long-term focus of mine, this crisis presents an opportunity to design and demand real change. These barriers threaten all of us, not just those who face them directly. COVID-19 has indubitably demonstrated that fact. None of us are untouchable.

6 Big Takeaways Regarding the Restaurant and Bar Industry

This morning I had the pleasure of meeting with government officials from the DC Department of Health and the DC Council. We discussed anxiety and coping strategies for the many service Industry employees heading back to work. Also included were local restaurant leadership/owners, business leaders, and legal experts. It was very informative, and more info to come.

Virginia is starting phase 2, Maryland is 1.5, and DC is taking a slower and more measured approach, even though throngs of protesters certainly make that a challenge.

6 Big Takeaways Regarding the Restaurant and Bar Industry

1. You can and should call in sick if you need to. You cannot be penalized or retaliated against by employers.

2. Similarly, if there are health practices in your business establishment that make you uncomfortable, you are protected as a whistle blower.

3. My point: Restaurant leadership needs to inform patrons about the procedures and protocols. Often, people who seem to have bad behavior, simply don’t know what they are supposed to be doing and not doing. Information needs to be readily available on websites and in restaurants.
People are excited to go back to restaurants, but this is not a one-sided deal. Respect those who feed you. 

4. The biggest concerns that front line restaurant and bar workers expressed to me:
–  The trade-off between potential financial hardship and risking your life and your family’s on a daily basis to do your job. Remember, that patrons do not wear masks while eating, talking, and drinking. There is inherent risk.
–  The complete uncertainty of what’s going to happen next. There could be another shut down in the near future, and there is no way to predict what’s going to happen. Business is certainly going to proceed at a lowered capacity.
–  The porous lines between Virginia, Maryland, and DC. Workers and patrons going back-and-forth, making it harder to control safety regulations. 
– The pivot. 20% of restaurant jobs, and likely restaurants that are privately owned, will be gone. How does one transfer the considerable skills that restaurant folks have to other fields?
– The importance of communication and feeling heard. I suggested that every restaurant have a team of people that are assigned to work with front of the house and back of the house workers as emotional coaches.

5. Mental health is just as important as physical health. During the pandemic, clinical depression hit the highest national average recorded, in May 2020. That month, 50% of Americans met the criteria for major depression. ( US Census Bureau)

6. Self-care is crucial. In the best of times, the industry is one of the highest for levels of stress. Sleep well, eat healthy, exercise, meditate or follow personal spiritual practices, rest, and have a strong social support network.

Seek therapy or teletherapy when needed. Resources are available.

Ten strategies to cope with anxiety about COVID-19

In my upcoming book, Fight/Flight/Flow, I discuss the importance of anxiety. Anxiety is a natural human reaction that involves mind and body. It serves an important basic survival function: Anxiety is an alarm system that is activated whenever a person perceives danger or threat. Anxiety is both in the mind, or cognitive; and in the body, in the form of physical symptoms.

When the body and mind react to danger or threat, a person feels physical sensations of anxiety — things like a faster heartbeat and breathing, insomnia, tense muscles, sweaty palms, a queasy stomach, and trembling hands or legs. These sensations are part of the body’s fight-flight response. The fight response can make us angry and irritable. The flight response can make us avoidant and isolated. These are caused by a rush of adrenaline, cortisol, and other chemicals that prepare the body to make a quick getaway from danger. They can be mild or extreme.

My psychotherapy for anxiety involves what I call the flow response. It’s hunkering in place, but not in a passive way. It’s observing, holding, and waiting. It’s like floating in water. You’re still in it, but you’re not thrashing about.

The fight-flight response happens instantly when a person senses a threat. It takes a few seconds longer for the thinking part of the brain (the prefrontal cortex) to process the situation and evaluate whether the threat is real, and if so, how to handle it. If the cortex sends the all-clear signal, the fight-flight response is deactivated and the nervous system can start to relax. If the mind reasons that a threat might last, feelings of anxiety might linger, keeping the person alert. Physical sensations such as rapid, shallow breathing; a pounding heart; tense muscles; insomnia; gastrointestinal problems; choking sensation; trembling; and sweaty palms might continue, too. Lastly, anxiety is curvilinear. A little bit of it can motivate us to problem solve and take action. A lot can immobilize and sicken us.

Tips to manage anxiety during these challenging times:

1. Sense of community.
Being there for and with others lessens our solitary load. From virtual exercise classes, virtual classrooms, volunteering, and zoom cocktail hours, feeling connected decreases anxiety. We are social creatures, and separating has been very difficult for many.

2. The spiritual life.
From meditation and yoga, to a peaceful walk in nature, a personal home altar, or faith based activities, these pastimes help reduce our panic and sense of fear.

3. The foundations of self-care.
Keeping to good sleep hygiene habits, nutritious meals, and daily exercise. All three of these are potent medicine.

4. Reflect don’t react.
There are many choices within our control even when we feel out of control. Dr. Victor Frankl, who was incarcerated in a concentration camp and wrote “Man’s Search for Meaning,” stated everything can be taken from a man but one thing, the last of the human freedoms, to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way of being.

5. Place stones across the river.
This is my method that I teach to patients, that consists of piecing together the small moments that make each day meaningful and significant. Speaking with a great friend, playing or cuddling with your companion animal, enjoying the beauty of the spring time, having the perfect cup of coffee, taking a moment to connect with others online, listening to your favorite music. These seemingly insignificant things become a powerful gestalt when they are pieced together, and help make our brains create hopeful pathways.

6. You are not your day.
If you have a day where nothing feels hopeful, or an even an hour of despair, it does not define you. It will pass. Remind yourself of the times that you persevered through catastrophic times. Reboot. You can even make self statement index cards and read them to yourself. Remind yourself that this too shall pass.

7. Disconnect.
Sleep, rest your body, turn off the screens, don’t read the news. We can stay in formed but we can also inundate our brain with information and misinformation.

8. Question.
Not everything you read in the news or the Internet is accurate. Similarly, when we are having anxiety or depression, our brain is a trickster that tells us misinformation. We can learn to refute it.

9. Schedule.
Keep to a routine as much as possible. This should include the aforementioned exercises, meal prep and planning, sleep, work, outdoor time, social media time, and downtime.

10. Breath-work and grounding.
Strategies that I teach individuals with anxiety disorders can be used by anyone, you can take them with you anywhere. Using the power of your breathing, close your eyes, take a deep breath in through your nose, and exhale slowly through your mouth. Repeat. And again. Similarly, you can ground your body by progressive muscle relaxation, this is a series of moments of tightening and releasing your muscles starting at your feet and working all the way up to the top of your head. For example, clench your feet hold for five seconds, and release. Continue to your legs, and so on. There are many guided strategies on the Calm App or HeadSpace, on Apple and android, that can help you practice these methods.

If you feel that anxiety is trying to take over your life, please seek professional support. Embolden offices are now offering free 30 minute sessions to first responders.

On talking to the kiddos and executive functioning

It’s hard for many people to put the coronavirus global crisis into perspective. It’s even harder to explain it to children. But understanding the big picture can often help us make sense of what’s happening around us.

Some kids—and adults—have a hard time seeing the bigger context in situations. (It’s common with kids who have trouble with executive function.) That’s not necessarily a bad thing, especially for kids who get more nervous the more they hear and know.

But for other kids, not understanding what’s going on makes it harder for them to cope. It raises their anxiety level because they don’t always recognize that people are doing things to reduce the threat. 

To help them get a broader idea of what’s happening and be less anxious, start with what they know, says Ellen Braaten, PhD, director of the Learning and Emotional Assessment Program (LEAP) and co-director of the Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital.

“Correct their misconceptions and then help them organize their thinking on the topic,” Braaten says. “Emotions tend to ‘de-organize thoughts,’ so you need to keep things real.

“You could say things like: ‘Scientists predict that this kind of virus can spread quickly. But it can’t spread as much when people stay apart for a while. That’s why you’ll be home from school for a while,’” she says.

It’s important to talk about what you’ll do during the time off. Share how you’ll continue to do things to stay healthy, like washing hands and getting enough sleep. Explain that doctors, nurses, and other health care workers are working very hard to understand how to help people, and they’re doing a good job at it. Emphasize the importance of having a routine.

“To do this, you need to be informed yourself,” says Braaten. “You also need to be able to discuss this in a fairly non-emotional way.”

(Stats from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatrics).

Embolden Psychology
Embolden

Embolden offers the ADOS-2, the gold standard assessment for kids on the spectrum.

Combined with psychoeducational testing, it helps provide comprehensive information and recommendations to help children and teens six and up.

Thank you for contacting us.