Category Archives: Covid-19 Crisis

How to take care of your mental health during election weeks

How to take care of your mental health during election weeks

SCHEDULE
Remember to sleep, eat healthy, hydrate, exercise, ADLs, clean your house, and speak to your therapist. These things don’t change, the environment does.

NEWS
Define and create boundaries on your time exposed to news and social media.

Rather than watching or listening to coverage at random throughout your day, create a time block for catching up. This can be in the morning as you prepare for the day or in the evening as you wind down—whatever works best for your schedule.

Select your news sources beforehand so that you’re not bouncing around on the TV or scrolling Twitter or FB mindlessly. Find a few outlets you trust And always fact-check. Look for empirical evidence.
Then, turn it off. Absorbing constant news is not helpful, especially when the content is simply being repeated.

MINDFULNESS
Set aside a specific hour to journal or worry. Let your mind and your anxieties run full force, during this circumscribed time. If intrusive thoughts become prominent during the day, let yourself know that you will have this hour to let them have their reign.

CONVERSATIONS
The more involved you are with this election and results , the more likely you may disagree with family members or friends. Difficult conversations are inevitable; the important thing is that we know how to take care of ourselves in the aftermath.

I recommend using a breathing or relaxation app after engaging in these kinds of dialogues or getting outside for a walk and fresh air. Don’t bottle up your emotions or shame yourself for getting worked up—it’s okay to experience tears and anger. Rather than suppressing your feelings, nurture them. Breathe. Drink a glass of water. Allow yourself to rest. Please use meditation apps that have relaxation features, such as the Calm app,  which works well on Apple and Android. 

Holding feelings inside without ventilation can actually be harmful to our emotional AND physical health. When having these conversations with others, know your points and practice active listening. If the conversation begins to feel combative, consider bowing out or stepping away so that everyone can regain composure.

SELF-CARE
On the day of the election, start it with a moment of gratitude and self-care. This may look like journaling, exercise, a short meditation, or a morning walk. Election Day can feel cumbersome and stressful, so it’s even more important to put a self-care plan in place.

BOUNDARIES
When it comes to politics, I come from a family of divorce and strong opinions. I also have neighbors with varying political stances. Having these boundaries means offering one another the space to celebrate, mourn, and process feelings as needed.

FEEL
From anger to sadness or relief. It’s all to be expected, and these feelings are valid. Allow yourself to feel whatever it is you’re feeling. One of the greatest gifts we can give ourselves is to embrace these emotions and then move them through and out of our bodies. Tears, exercise, creative projects, and fresh air can all help with this.

PROCESS
In the days pre and post-election, we’re all going to have a lot to process. Be kind and carve out more space for self-care than usual. Consider taking time away from the news and social media. It is okay to take a break, to retreat to nature, and to spend a few days crying or celebrating virtually with friends. To avoid political fatigue and to keep fighting for the causes we care about, we must allow ourselves moments to step away and breathe.

10 Difficulties With Fall Distance Learning

Currently, approximately 4% of colleges are fully re-opening their doors to in person instruction for the fall semester. For younger students, public school has been variable, and often a hybrid model. While physical safety is paramount, it’s also important to acknowledge that there is an emotional toll for many students. In my practice, what I have most noticed is that assignments are piling up and not being turned in. According to a study conducted during the summer of 2020, over 75% of college students reported feeling more anxiety, stress, or even depression, due to online learning. A similar number of students have noted that they find it difficult to access their instructors between class sessions.

Additional concerns related to online learning:

Time management.
Students have to clock in by a certain time to be counted as present or otherwise tardy. Being at home makes it tempting to stay up late, and sleep deprivation and staying in bed are the norm for many young people during the current time.

Work management.
Many students have difficulty tracking assignments, due dates, and deadlines, online.

Zoom fatigue
The majority of students are muted and have video turned off. Several of my clients play video games and even sleep while attempting to be in class.

Distractibility
Pets, siblings, even parents, working from home, can be very distracting.

Lack of social interaction
In class, having your peers present with you makes it an experience that is much more supportive and positive.

Covid factors
While experiencing stress, anxiety related to health, or difficulty with social distancing, the majority of students have reported that these factors are not taken into consideration by their instructors or educational institutions. For example, a young woman reported that deadlines have to be met, no matter what the extraneous circumstances.

Lack of workspace or Internet availability
A number of students have been unable to get online except for on a cell phone. All of their classroom instruction was done from a cell phone, which is quite challenging. Often, their parents did not know how to access the information that was needed to successfully conduct a school day. Recently, through my practice, I was able to gather a group of volunteers, who helped families set up online learning. For other students, there is lack of space in the home to have a quiet classroom atmosphere. I discourage working from bedrooms because of the distractibility factor, but often there are no other spaces that are available.

Inability to access extracurricular activities
For many students, some of the most enjoyable and positive aspects of school include being in clubs, sports, and after school activities. Many of these have been diminished, which makes it even less palatable to be in school online.

Parental stress
The majority of students do not see their parents at work or experience the work stressors that their parents may go through. With many parents working from home, there is much more exposure to work related stress. One young client reported that her parents are in the home and yet they are never fully present. Conversely, for parents, having to monitor school related activities, while attending to their work responsibilities is very challenging.

Pacing
I strongly encourage my clients to take frequent breaks to stretch, move around the room, and eat snacks. The average attention span is 45 minutes or less, and lengthy online classes are often taxing and exhausting.

At Embolden Psychology, we have put forth a number of recommendations for managing feelings like stress, boredom, anxiety, depression, fear, and loneliness during social distancing, including:

Shifting the mental framing of social distancing- believing that one is “safe at home” versus “stuck at home” can have a profound effect on sense of agency, and reduce feelings of helplessness and fear. Agency matters.

Maintaining remote social contact with friends and colleagues can help limit feelings of loneliness. Text, FaceTime, call.

Enjoying simple physical comforts, like a hot shower, sipping a hot beverage, cuddling a companion animal, or wrapping oneself in a blanket may reduce feelings of loneliness.

Please spend time outdoors. Our bodies cannot store vitamin D, and we need this essential nutrient for mental health and wellness. Whether it’s taking a walk down your street or sitting on your deck, sunlight is essential.

Keeping to routines. Go to bed at the same time, wake up at the same time, as much as possible. Make sure you eat at regular time intervals. Keeping to a schedule helps maintain mental health.

Resources that rock:
1. SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline: 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters–call 800.985.5990
2. 7 Cups: A free online text chat service that connects individuals with a trained listener for emotional support and counseling – visit: www.7cups.com
3. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Those who are experiencing suicidal thought and impulses can call 800.273.8255 or text HOME to 741741 for support

#WorldMentalHealthDay

Today is #WorldMentalHealth day.

I grew up in a South Asian family that didn’t believe in mental health, even with numerous family members with generally undiagnosed eating disorders, depression, anxiety, ADHD, personality disorders, suicides, and PTSD.  Intergenerational trauma is a term that describes how oppressive events that impacted one generation and remain unaddressed are carried over to later generations.

BIPOC Individuals are much less likely to receive support for mental health awareness and treatment. Racism, stigma, financial hardship, unfamiliarity, and lack of trust make it much harder for people of color to receive or even seek mental health services. As a community dedicated to mental health, we must persevere to change this. #EmboldenPsychology is dedicated to making mental health more accessible. 

Black Americans have higher rates of depression, anxiety, learning differences, and sleep and digestive problems, studies have found. Racially discriminatory events have led Black people to be in a state of high arousal — which means a heightened level of situational awareness and vigilance. This hypervigilance is harmful, medically and psychologically, and has very similar effects as studies on PTSD on brain and developmental functioning.

Asian Americans are discriminated against for their looks, languages and culture. They also face a great amount of family and social stress by having to represent their family and embody two cultures: that of their heritage and being “American” in the US. Depression and anxiety have skyrocketed in the community. 
Native American communities are often geographically disconnected and are significantly underserved, with a disproportionate level of substance abuse, depression, anxiety, sexual assault, and domestic abuse.
Microaggressions for BIPOC individuals cumulatively take their toll, and so do emotional and physical responses to vicarious and direct experiences with racial violence and racism. In the mental health industry, there is a significant lack of education, availability, and research regarding serving people of color. In a 2015 national survey of the mental health professions, close to 90% of all therapists were white. Very few training programs integrate diversity training as part of their broad curriculum.

In this time period of COVID-19, a significant national uptick in mental disorders, and great unrest, mental health awareness is more important than ever.

Distance learning tips for students

A few distance learning tips for students:

Identify a study space
Identifying a consistent study space in your home. A study space does not always need to be a separate room. Oftentimes, a simple table and chair works quite well. Keep in mind, however, that being in your room can make it tempting to engage in other activities. Completing your classroom work and homework in the same place each time creates a focused thinking habit that allows you to more quickly settle into the work that needs to be done. It also signals to other people in your home that you are in work mode.

Keep to your class schedule, even when you are home
If you were attending an in person study group or regularly met with a teacher in a classroom, continue to do your work at those same times. You have already established a routine and one of the best things you can with distance learning is to keep that routine. It is important to keep that time free from other personal obligations. Some students just login for the day, and then wander in and out, leading to undesired outcomes.

Use a day planner or calendar
Record ALL: Assignments, tests, quizzes, and projects.
If you have not started using a planner/calendar, now is a very important time to do so. When you’re at home,it’s easy to think you have more time than you actually do.  Phone reminders are not enough. With distance learning, time may appear to “fly by” as the semester goes forward. Use a calendar to create weekly lists of assignment due dates and tasks you may need to do to complete those assignments.

Get a tutor or academic coach
For more specific help with breaking up assignments and exam prep into manageable steps, speak to a therapist or executive functioning coach.

Communicate with your family
Changes in school, sports, parents working from home, and shifting event schedules may create a new level of activity in your home. It is completely natural to be a bit uncertain as these changes are underway. One important step is to talk with your family regarding the specific impact on you. What is hard for you, and what are some things that can happen to make things easier to do your work from home? Explain that you need a quiet, uninterrupted space for some time each week to continue to meet your school goals. This should include no interruptions from family animals or younger siblings.

Ask for help
Moving from one style of learning to another does require an adjustment in your study approach. Your teachers are aware of this and will work with you. Make it a habit to touch base by email with all your teachers on a weekly :basis. That way it doesn’t feel strange to do it after school has already been in session for several weeks.

Prepare for the day
Have your materials ready at your workspace. If you were heading to school or the bus stop, you would pack your backpack and make sure you have what you need. Including any written work, notebooks, pens and pencils, calculator, textbooks, etc. I recommend the use of a large notepad so that you can jot down questions as classes proceed. Many people are afraid to use the group chat and don’t want to draw attention. In that case, write down questions as they occur, so that you can email the teacher later to make sure you understood the concept or the assignment.

Keep up your energy level by self-care
It’s been shown that distance-learning is exhausting. Video is usually off, voices are muted, and classes are long. People have trouble focusing. Keeping this in mind, it’s important to know that the best way to refresh your brain is to get up and move around or stretch. Set a kitchen timer or alarm clock to go off every 25 to 30 minutes to remind you to get up and move your body. Also have healthy snacks to keep up your energy at the ready. Do not skip meals, because this creates a brain drain.

Keep up with friends
Many students miss the social aspects of seeing their friends in the cafeteria, in the hallway, or in the classroom. Virtual classrooms do not allow for much interaction. Keep up with a group chat or other friend-based activities so that you feel connected. The social aspects of school are extremely important, in addition to the academic focus.

Set Up family reading or quiet hours
With some teens/children also moving to distance learning, there is an opportunity to create a family study space. For example, consider creating a “family reading hour” where all devices are put away, turned off or silenced. Identify a goal for everyone including yourself. When you are finished, have everyone, including you, share a little bit about what they read or learned in class that day. “Teaching” others helps with memory and understanding of reading material. When the hour is complete, do a shared fun activity (play a game, watch a family favorite TV show, etc.) to reward everyone for meeting their reading goal.

Connect with your school counselor
It’s OK to reach out when you’re having anxiety about distance learning, a specific class, how to turn in assignments, or any other school related issue. Guidance counselors always tell me that they enjoy hearing from students, but with distance-learning, students very rarely reach out.

Work together on a family schedule
I have included one in this post that I personally use with families to break down the day, to make sure there is time proportionally allocated for all activities, and not just academic time.  This can be easily adjusted for each family’s specific needs.

Communication and mental flexibility
Basically, everything in this blog requires fine-tuning as circumstances change. More than ever, our times call for flexing. Having family conversations on all of these topics is the key to success.

Small but mighty hacks to improve your mental health

According to the World Health Organization “mental health is an integral part of health; indeed, there is no health without mental health.”

Here are a few small but mighty hacks to improve your mental health.
1. Open up and depend on others more emotionally, sharing vulnerable feelings, like sadness or fear or loneliness.

2. Check in with others regularly. Having connections, even sending or receiving a simple text or a good morning, has been shown to improve mood and decrease anxiety.

3. A change of scene or a change of pace is good for your mental health. It could be a five-minute pause from virtual learning or zoom office meetings to stretch, a half-hour lunch break at work, or a weekend exploring somewhere new. A few minutes can be enough to de-stress you. Give yourself some ‘me time’.

4. Do something you’re good at. What do you love doing? What activities can you lose yourself in? Enjoying yourself can help beat stress. Doing an activity you enjoy probably means you’re good at it, and achieving something boosts your self-esteem.

5. Helping others. Volunteering, helping an elder or neighbor, even taking the time to help a friend with tech support, pet sitting, or picking up groceries: caring for others boosts our mood, a win-win.

6. Emotional eating, in a good way. Boost brainpower by treating yourself to a couple pieces of dark chocolate every few days. The flavanoids, caffeine, and theobromine in chocolate are thought to work together to improve alertness and mental skills. Marine based omega-3 foods are also great for mood, attention, and alertness.

7. Spend some time with a furry friend. Time with animals lowers the stress hormone – cortisol, and boosts oxytocin – which stimulates feelings of happiness.

8. Set your morning foundations. Meditate, yoga, work out, check in with loved ones, check your to do list, pray, read. It creates the tone for the rest of the day.

9. Let it all out…on paper. Writing about upsetting experiences can reduce symptoms of depression. The psychologist James Pennebaker did a series of elegant studies that found that writing stream of consciousness in a journal even 10 minute a day, reduced acute symptoms of depression commensurate with taking an antidepressant.

10.  Relax in a warm bath once a week. Try adding Epsom salts to help soothe aches and pains and help boost magnesium levels, which can be depleted by stress. Taking a hot shower or a warm bath before bedtime, followed by the cooling of the body, actually mimics REM sleep, during which time your body temperature drops and creates a sense of relaxation.

11. Take time to laugh. Hang out with a funny friend, watch a comedy, or check out cute animal videos online. Laughter helps reduce anxiety.

12. Go off the grid. Leave your cell phone at home for a day and disconnect from constant emails, alerts, and other interruptions. Spend time doing something fun with someone face-to-face or alone time.

13. Take 30 minutes to go for a walk in nature – it could be a stroll through a park, or a hike in the woods. Research shows that being in nature can increase energy levels, reduce depression and boost well-being. Sunlight synthesizes vitamin D which is not naturally stored in the body. When it is depleted, it can contribute to feelings of depression.

14. Practice planning.  Try meal prepping or picking out your clothes for the work week. You’ll save some time in the mornings and have a sense of control about the week ahead. 

15. Organize. I have my clients keep a master day planner, not just Google Reminders and calendars. Using different colored pens, account for all of your activities: work, academic, social, medical, family, recreation, and self care. Having it all in one place is powerful, and a reminder to be mindful to all different aspects of life.

16. Practice my clinical strategy, stones across the river. Pay mindful attention to the small things that happen every day that can bring moments of satisfaction or joy. When they are strung together, they provide a path that doesn’t seem obvious at first, but can ford the rapids.

How to help a loved one with depression

Depression doesn’t happen in a vacuum. It causes a ripple effect that touches everyone surrounding the person. Family members and friends often feel helpless, not knowing how to reach out or what to do to help their suffering loved one.

It would be nice if the depressed person could specifically vocalize their needs, so that friends and families knew exactly what to say and do. However, the paradox of depression can be immobility and lack of motivation. Vegetative symptoms are disturbances of a person’s functions necessary to maintain life. These disturbances are most commonly seen in mood disorders, and are part of the diagnostic criteria for depression.

Vegetative symptoms in a patient with typical depression include:
Weight loss and anorexia (loss of appetite) or overeating
Insomnia or hypersomnia.
Fatigue and low energy
Inattention and memory problems
Poor communication

1. Educate Yourself About Depression and Other Mood Disorders.
You may not be able to cure your loved one. But you can better understand their condition by educating yourself about depression or mood disorder. Reading up on your loved one’s illness will help you feel more in control of the situation and give you more patience to tolerate the confusing or frustrating symptoms.

2. Ask Open-ended Questions
Do not go in with the attitude that you know better, and you know what’s going to work to help them feel better. Listen to their personal experience.

3. Help Them Identify and Cope With Sources of Life Stress
It’s no secret that stress is a significant contributor to depression. Chronic levels of stress pour cortisol into your bloodstream and cause inflammation in your nervous system and every other biological system. In a study in Scientific Reports, a neuroscience journal, stress was shown to reduce the brain’s innate ability to keep itself healthy. The hippocampus, which regulates mood, shrinks, negatively impacting our short-term memory function and learning abilities.

4. Remind Them That They’re Incredibly Strong
When you’re depressed, you don’t believe that you’re worthy of love. I call this the secret symptom of depression, the feeling that you are unimportant and don’t matter in the universe. That’s what makes relationships and communication so difficult. One way of helping is by reminding them of their strengths. Use concrete examples. Cite times in their lives they exemplified courage, stamina, compassion, integrity, and perseverance. One colleague of mine will say, remember your name, who are you?

In a series of studies that I conducted at the Catholic University of America, in Washington, DC, I found that people with depression literally do not remember positive aspects of a singular activity. For example, when shown movies that had a range of affect from joyful to traumatic, the more painful and traumatic memories in the films were later most remembered on memory tasks given to individuals identified as depressed.

5. Make Them Smile, Because Laughter Helps.
Humor can help us heal from a number of illnesses, including depression. In Darkness Visible, the writer William Styron described his journey through severe depression. Humor was one of the things that helped him survive. Watch a favorite show or listen to a shared podcast with your depressed loved one. You don’t have to fake laughter, let it emerge on its own.

6. Let Them Know They Won’t Always Feel This Way.
This is a powerful message. When combined with helping them remember past struggles that they mastered, it shows that there is hope.

7. If You Do Only One Thing, Let It Be Listening
Listen. Suspend all judgments, save all interjections … don’t be a know it all. Do nothing more than make excellent eye contact, reflect on what you are hearing, and open your ears. It’s the most powerful wisdom.

Mental health and Corona

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly one in five of U.S. adults (47 million) reported having a mental illness in the past year, and over 11 million had a serious mental illness, which frequently results in functional impairment and limits life activities. Please remember that these are only the reported numbers, because many people do not seek help or endorse symptoms.

The COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic recession have negatively affected many people’s mental health and created new barriers for people already suffering from mental illness and substance use disorders, who were previously substantial in number. In polls conducted in mid-July, 53% of adults in the United States reported that their mental health has been negatively impacted due to worry and stress over the coronavirus. This is significantly higher than the 32% reported in March. Many adults are also reporting specific negative impacts on their mental health and wellbeing, such as difficulty sleeping (36%) or eating (32%), increases in alcohol consumption or substance use (12%), and worsening chronic conditions (12%), due to worry and stress over the coronavirus. As the pandemic wears on, ongoing and necessary public health measures expose many people to experiencing situations linked to poor mental health outcomes, such as isolation, health worries, evictions, and job loss.

Some takeaways:
A broad body of research links social isolation and loneliness to poor mental health, and data from late March shows that significantly higher shares of people who were sheltering in place (47%) reported negative mental health effects resulting from worry or stress related to coronavirus. In particular, isolation and loneliness during the pandemic may present specific mental health risks for households with adolescents and for older adults. The share of older adults (ages 65 and up) reporting negative mental health impacts has very significantly increased since March. Polling data shows that women with children under the age of 18 are more likely to report major negative mental health impacts than their male counterparts.

Research also shows that job loss is associated with increased depression, anxiety, distress, and low self-esteem and may lead to higher rates of substance use disorder and suicide. Recent polling data shows that more than half of the people who lost income or employment reported negative mental health impacts from worry or stress over coronavirus; and lower income people reported much higher rates of major negative mental health impacts compared to higher income people.

Poor mental health due to burnout among front-line workers and increased anxiety or mental illness among those with poor physical health are also concerns. Those with mental illness and substance use disorders pre-pandemic, and those newly affected, will likely require mental health and substance use services. The pandemic spotlights both existing and new barriers to accessing mental health and substance use disorder services.

In my practice, many people do not have access to consistent Wi-Fi or Internet service. During this unprecedented time of uncertainty and fear, it is likely that mental health issues and substance use disorders among people with these conditions will be exacerbated.

Embolden remains dedicated to providing access and services for medical professionals and front line personnel. The long-term effects that we are experiencing cannot be minimized.

How to help a loved one who is having mental health problems

We all go through tough times and people help us through them. Other times we have been worried about other people’s mental health. Whether they are a friend, family member, significant other, neighbor, or colleague, there are many ways to support somebody you care about.

1 in 6 people experienced a common mental health problem such as anxiety or depression in the past week.

Talking about mental health
If you are worried about someone it can be difficult to know what to do. When you are aware there is an issue, it is important not to wait. One of the saddest components of depression is that it is immobilizing. You can simultaneously know that you desperately need help, and have absolutely no energy or desire to seek it.

Waiting and hoping others will come to you for help might lose valuable time in getting them support. Openly talking with someone is often the first step to take when you know they are going through a hard time. This way you can find out what is troubling them and what you can do to help.

Eight tips for talking about mental health:

  1. Set time aside with no distractions. It is important to provide an open and non-judgemental space.
  2. Let them share as much or as little as they want to. Let them lead the discussion at their own pace. Don’t put pressure on them to tell you anything they aren’t ready to talk about. Talking can take a lot of trust and courage. You might be the first person they have been able to talk to about this.
  3. Don’t try to diagnose or second guess their feelings. You probably aren’t a medical expert and, while you may be happy to talk and offer support, you aren’t a trained counsellor. Try not to make assumptions about what is wrong or jump in too quickly with your own diagnosis or solutions.
  4. Keep questions open ended. Say “Why don’t you tell me how you are feeling?” rather than “I can see you are feeling very low”. Try to keep your language neutral. Give the person time to answer and try not to grill them with too many questions.
  5. Talk about wellbeing. Exercise, having a healthy diet and taking a break can help protect mental health and sustain wellbeing. Talk about ways of de-stressing and ask if they find anything helpful.
  6. Listen carefully to what they tell you. Repeat what they have said back to them to ensure you have understood it. You don’t have to agree with what they are saying, but by showing you understand how they feel, you are letting them know you respect their feelings.
  7. Offer them help in seeking professional support and provide information on ways to do this.
  8. Know your limits. If you believe they are in immediate danger or they have incurred injuries that need medical attention, you need to take action to make sure they are safe. More details on dealing in a crisis can be found below.

How do I respond in a crisis?

People with mental health problems sometimes experience a crisis, such as breaking down in tears, having a panic attack, feeling suicidal, or experiencing a different sense of reality (dissociation). This may include even losing a sense of time and place. You may feel a sense of crisis too, in response, but it’s important to stay calm yourself.

There are some general strategies that you can use to help:

    • Listen without making judgements and concentrate on their needs in that moment.
    • Ask them what would help them.
    • Reassure and help point them to practical information or resources.
    • Avoid confrontation.
    • Ask if there is someone they would like you to contact.
    • Encourage them to seek appropriate professional help.
    • If they have hurt themselves, make sure they get the first aid they need.

Seeing, hearing or believing things that no-one else does can be the symptom of a mental health problem. It can be frightening and upsetting. Gently remind the person who you are and why you are there. Under extreme stress, people can dissociate. Don’t reinforce or dismiss their experiences, but acknowledge how the symptoms are making them feel.

How do I respond if someone is suicidal?
If someone tells you they are feeling suicidal or can’t go on, or if you suspect they are thinking of taking their own life, it is very important to encourage them to get help.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
Hours: Available 24 hours. Languages: English and Spanish
1-800-273-8255

Executive functioning and COVID-19

Many of you are excellent teachers, and probably didn’t know it. I’m a clinical psychologist of 23 years with a neural science background, and I have worked with children and teens every one of those years. I have literally met and spoken in detail with thousands of children and families. They are MY teachers.

When you show your kids that they, and you, don’t wear masks, don’t social distance, hang out in public places, pick fun over health, and disregard safety of others,  you are teaching LOTS. 

  • Rules don’t apply to you.
  • Impulse control doesn’t matter, do what YOU wanna do.
  • Being uncomfortable, physically or emotionally, is just too hard.
  • Fun before safety.
  • Others don’t matter, it’s about you.
  • You are healthy right now, so why worry. 
  • Emerging research doesn’t matter; it’s changing anyway, so it’s irrelevant.
  • Uncertainty is unbearable.
  • Everyone else is doing it, so why not.

Unfortunately, children with their developing frontal lobes do not apply these rules, which are aspects of executive functioning, to a single situation. They are generalized and integrated at the neuronal level. They are learning, growing beings.

[“But Doctor, Junior will not follow basic household rules. They only think about themselves. And she goes out every weekend and does risky things. It’s so frustrating.”]

Um. 

Obviously, there are many families working hard, and I mean hard, to keep others and themselves safe. I know it’s not easy, I hear from you every day. Big respect. There are also creative solutions. May you all have a healthy summer and fall.

Embolden Psychology
Embolden

Embolden offers the ADOS-2, the gold standard assessment for kids on the spectrum.

Combined with psychoeducational testing, it helps provide comprehensive information and recommendations to help children and teens six and up.

Thank you for contacting us.