Tag Archives: depression

Personal Prescriptions

One of the questions I get asked most frequently by patients: What can I do, if I don’t want to or cannot take medication for anxiety or depression? I say: even if you’re taking medication, you need these. I actually write a prescription for the following recommendations.

* Sweat. Whatever exercise you love or can tolerate, do it most days of the week. Move.

* Sleep. Rest fiercely. We live a life with more obligations and responsibilities than one could imagine. The internet stole the rest. Sleep is the friend we take for granted, but forget that it needs tending. Constantly. For more info see Making Sleep Your Best Friend

* Sunlight/Earth. Get outside, every single day. Even when you cannot, bring nature inside. For more info see The Sun and Mental Health and The Psychology of House Plants.

* Bark/Purr. Spend as much time as possible with companion animals. It lowers your blood pressure, creates oxytocin, and beats loneliness. See also Mental Health and Companion Animals.

* Help. Innately, we need to help others. Whether it’s a neighbor, charity, volunteer opportunity, or community service, giving creates feel-good hormones.  See also The Mental Health Benefits of Random Acts of Kindness.

* Eat. Food is medicine. There is no diet that works for everybody, but figuring out what gives you maximum energy, nutrition, and satisfaction is key. Master cooking a few delicious dishes. See also Turmeric and Mental Health.

* Express. Dance, sing, write, draw, create. Give voice to your experience. Depression stifles our feelings. Anxiety makes it hard to even express them. See also Relaxation Place.

* Play. Watch your favorite shows. Read for pleasure, not work. Play your favorite game: board game, word game, video game. Work on a puzzle. Have regular chats or Zooms set up with your besties if you cannot see them in person. Our brains need downtime. It is essential, not a waste. See also Why It’s Hard to Say Goodbye to Our Favorite Shows.

*Breathe. Martial arts, meditation, yoga, breath work. These activities performed regularly drop tension and stress, empirically. See also Meditation For Troubled Times.

*Pray. Personal spirituality or prayer improves mental health, with robust findings for reductions in anxiety and depression. See also Personal Praying May Boost Mental Health.

*Forgive. Yourself and others. We collect wounds through our years. We often can’t let them go. As important as letting go of the aggression sent our way by others, we MUST let go of self hatred, self blame, and self denial. See also Why Self-Compassion is More Important Than Self-Esteem.

Depression Is:

Depression Is:
Emotional: Your baseline enjoyment of life decreases. In other words, you start constantly feeling a sense of suffering, or emotional pain, for no clear reason. Your are more negatively impacted by set-backs, and find it harder to enjoy the things that bring you pleasure and joy.

Physical : You have less energy. Just about anything feels like a tiresome undertaking, and you often feel like just lying down and doing nothing. It may seem impossible to do the smallest of tasks. Getting out of bed, taking a shower, brushing your teeth, cleaning up, or checking your email can feel like Herculean tasks.

Mental: Your thinking becomes distorted and negative. Your self esteem decreases, so that you feel worthless. Thinking and concentraing becomes harder, as if trying to see something through a fog. It’s hard to imagine things becoming better, or to form a positive idea of the future in general. You have a variety of intrusive negative thoughts; these thoughts can happen regardless of however much you believe or agree with their content.

Additional resources:

What Not to Say to Someone with Depression.

National Emergency Helpline

 

Depression and Parenting

I was recently the speaker on The Zebra School, a parenting podcast, on pregnancy and mental health. Depression, both during pregnancy, and postpartum, are very serious concerns that can affect the entire family. The podcast and blog interview will be officially LIVE May 1, 2021. You can listen to the full interview on iTunes, Spotify, Google, and a few other audio platforms. Just search for The Zebra School on the desired platform.

Zebras are ungulates with an acute sense of hearing. Like a horse, a zebra can turn their ears in almost any direction – capturing the sounds of its environment with keen precision. Similarly, The Zebra School programs promote content committed to keeping our ears to the ground to stay abreast of relevant information taking place in the childhood space.

Smiling Depression

The term “smiling depression” – appearing happy to others while internally suffering significant depressive symptoms is receiving more research attention. While smiling depression is not a technical term that psychologists use based on ICD or DSM criteria, it is certainly possible to be depressed and manage to successfully mask the symptoms. The closest technical term for this condition is “atypical depression”. In fact, a significant proportion of people who experience a low mood and a loss of pleasure in activities manage to hide their condition in this way.

These people might be particularly vulnerable to suicide.

It can be very hard to spot people suffering from smiling depression. They may seem like they don’t have a reason to be sad – they have a job, popularity, and maybe even children or a partner. They smile when you greet them and can carry pleasant conversations. In short, they put on a mask to the outside world while leading seemingly normal and active lives. Tony Bourdain and Robin Williams are good examples.

Inside, however, they feel hopeless and down, intermittently having thoughts about ending it all. The strength that they have to go on with their daily lives can make them especially vulnerable to carrying out suicide plans.

Although people with smiling depression put on a “happy face” to the outside world, they can experience a genuine lift in their mood as a result of positive occurrences in their lives. For example, getting a text message from someone they’ve been craving to hear from, volunteering or doing community service to help others, or being praised at work can make them feel better for a few moments.

Other symptoms of this condition include under or overeating, substance abuse, irritability, feeling a sense of heaviness in the body, insomnia, and being easily hurt by criticism or rejection. People with smiling depression are also more likely to feel depressed in the evening, also known as sundowning, and feel the need to sleep longer than usual. Smiling depression is exhausting, because a great deal of mental effort is required for them to put forth the semblance that everything is fine.

Recently, Women’s Health magazine captured the essence of smiling depression – the façade – when it asked women to share pictures from their social media and then to recaption them on Instagram with how they really felt in the moment they were taking the picture.

It is difficult to determine exactly what causes smiling depression, but low mood can stem from a number of things, such as work problems, financial hardship, relationship breakdowns, and feeling as if life doesn’t have purpose and meaning. It is very common. About one in ten people are depressed, and between 15% and 40% of these people suffer from the atypical form that resembles smiling depression.

Such depression can often start early in life and can last a long time.If you suffer from smiling depression it is particularly important to get help. Sadly, though, people suffering from this condition usually don’t, because they might not think that they have a problem in the first place – this is particularly the case if they appear to be carrying on with their tasks and daily routines as before. In short, they get used to feeling bad. More than ever, it’s very important to check in with people who seem like they’re doing well, during difficult times.

How to help a loved one with depression

Depression doesn’t happen in a vacuum. It causes a ripple effect that touches everyone surrounding the person. Family members and friends often feel helpless, not knowing how to reach out or what to do to help their suffering loved one.

It would be nice if the depressed person could specifically vocalize their needs, so that friends and families knew exactly what to say and do. However, the paradox of depression can be immobility and lack of motivation. Vegetative symptoms are disturbances of a person’s functions necessary to maintain life. These disturbances are most commonly seen in mood disorders, and are part of the diagnostic criteria for depression.

Vegetative symptoms in a patient with typical depression include:
Weight loss and anorexia (loss of appetite) or overeating
Insomnia or hypersomnia.
Fatigue and low energy
Inattention and memory problems
Poor communication

1. Educate Yourself About Depression and Other Mood Disorders.
You may not be able to cure your loved one. But you can better understand their condition by educating yourself about depression or mood disorder. Reading up on your loved one’s illness will help you feel more in control of the situation and give you more patience to tolerate the confusing or frustrating symptoms.

2. Ask Open-ended Questions
Do not go in with the attitude that you know better, and you know what’s going to work to help them feel better. Listen to their personal experience.

3. Help Them Identify and Cope With Sources of Life Stress
It’s no secret that stress is a significant contributor to depression. Chronic levels of stress pour cortisol into your bloodstream and cause inflammation in your nervous system and every other biological system. In a study in Scientific Reports, a neuroscience journal, stress was shown to reduce the brain’s innate ability to keep itself healthy. The hippocampus, which regulates mood, shrinks, negatively impacting our short-term memory function and learning abilities.

4. Remind Them That They’re Incredibly Strong
When you’re depressed, you don’t believe that you’re worthy of love. I call this the secret symptom of depression, the feeling that you are unimportant and don’t matter in the universe. That’s what makes relationships and communication so difficult. One way of helping is by reminding them of their strengths. Use concrete examples. Cite times in their lives they exemplified courage, stamina, compassion, integrity, and perseverance. One colleague of mine will say, remember your name, who are you?

In a series of studies that I conducted at the Catholic University of America, in Washington, DC, I found that people with depression literally do not remember positive aspects of a singular activity. For example, when shown movies that had a range of affect from joyful to traumatic, the more painful and traumatic memories in the films were later most remembered on memory tasks given to individuals identified as depressed.

5. Make Them Smile, Because Laughter Helps.
Humor can help us heal from a number of illnesses, including depression. In Darkness Visible, the writer William Styron described his journey through severe depression. Humor was one of the things that helped him survive. Watch a favorite show or listen to a shared podcast with your depressed loved one. You don’t have to fake laughter, let it emerge on its own.

6. Let Them Know They Won’t Always Feel This Way.
This is a powerful message. When combined with helping them remember past struggles that they mastered, it shows that there is hope.

7. If You Do Only One Thing, Let It Be Listening
Listen. Suspend all judgments, save all interjections … don’t be a know it all. Do nothing more than make excellent eye contact, reflect on what you are hearing, and open your ears. It’s the most powerful wisdom.

Mental health and Corona

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly one in five of U.S. adults (47 million) reported having a mental illness in the past year, and over 11 million had a serious mental illness, which frequently results in functional impairment and limits life activities. Please remember that these are only the reported numbers, because many people do not seek help or endorse symptoms.

The COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic recession have negatively affected many people’s mental health and created new barriers for people already suffering from mental illness and substance use disorders, who were previously substantial in number. In polls conducted in mid-July, 53% of adults in the United States reported that their mental health has been negatively impacted due to worry and stress over the coronavirus. This is significantly higher than the 32% reported in March. Many adults are also reporting specific negative impacts on their mental health and wellbeing, such as difficulty sleeping (36%) or eating (32%), increases in alcohol consumption or substance use (12%), and worsening chronic conditions (12%), due to worry and stress over the coronavirus. As the pandemic wears on, ongoing and necessary public health measures expose many people to experiencing situations linked to poor mental health outcomes, such as isolation, health worries, evictions, and job loss.

Some takeaways:
A broad body of research links social isolation and loneliness to poor mental health, and data from late March shows that significantly higher shares of people who were sheltering in place (47%) reported negative mental health effects resulting from worry or stress related to coronavirus. In particular, isolation and loneliness during the pandemic may present specific mental health risks for households with adolescents and for older adults. The share of older adults (ages 65 and up) reporting negative mental health impacts has very significantly increased since March. Polling data shows that women with children under the age of 18 are more likely to report major negative mental health impacts than their male counterparts.

Research also shows that job loss is associated with increased depression, anxiety, distress, and low self-esteem and may lead to higher rates of substance use disorder and suicide. Recent polling data shows that more than half of the people who lost income or employment reported negative mental health impacts from worry or stress over coronavirus; and lower income people reported much higher rates of major negative mental health impacts compared to higher income people.

Poor mental health due to burnout among front-line workers and increased anxiety or mental illness among those with poor physical health are also concerns. Those with mental illness and substance use disorders pre-pandemic, and those newly affected, will likely require mental health and substance use services. The pandemic spotlights both existing and new barriers to accessing mental health and substance use disorder services.

In my practice, many people do not have access to consistent Wi-Fi or Internet service. During this unprecedented time of uncertainty and fear, it is likely that mental health issues and substance use disorders among people with these conditions will be exacerbated.

Embolden remains dedicated to providing access and services for medical professionals and front line personnel. The long-term effects that we are experiencing cannot be minimized.

Some thoughts on depression – Q&A

I was honored to be recently named as a Top Doc. It’s always gratifying to be recognized for good work, and this kudo comes with the bonus of having an active Q&A section on their website, where readers (and potential patients) can anonymously ask questions.  I’ve tried to find time to answer a bunch of these, and thought it might be helpful to share some of those questions, and answers, here.

This first batch all deal with depression.

Will my depression go on its own?
Hello, it really depends on how long you’ve been depressed, and what the other circumstances are that may be occurring. If you’ve had recurrent episodes- Therapy, possible medication consultation, and a self care regimen are absolutely essential to address it. The good news is that there are proven strategies that do work to help with distress and symptoms.

Can social workers suffer from depression?
Yes absolutely. Mental health workers have some of the highest burn out and that includes rates of depression, substance abuse, and anxiety. Self-care is crucial. It used to be done that social workers and psychologists were required to be in therapy as part of their training, and although that cannot be mandated by programs, I believe it’s a good thing to be in treatment at various stages of our own professional and personal lives.

Will my depression go on its own?
Hello, it really depends on how long you’ve been depressed, and what the other circumstances are that may be occurring. If you’ve had recurrent episodes- Therapy, possible medication consultation, and a self care regimen are absolutely essential to address it. The good news is that there are proven strategies that do work to help with distress and symptoms.

Can a divorce drive people toward depression?
In psychology there is a list of daily stressors or daily hassles. Going through a divorce or separation is one of the top stressors. Unfortunately, divorce is usually also combined with financial stress, location changes, shifting of social groups, family related issues, and at times issues related to children. It’s essential to make sure that you fit in time for self-care, and do some consults with a therapist to come up with a plan for coping and support.

There are many more questions on the site, on a variety of topics including stress management, OCD, anxiety and more. I’ll share more of those here, sometime in the near future.

Anxiety Toolkit

1.  Mindfulness Exercise
Start by taking a few deep breaths … breathing in through your nose … and then out through your mouth … in through your nose … and then out through your mouth. Then, while you continue to do so, gradually try to make yourself aware of:

  • 5 Things You Can See:  For example, the table in front of you, the nice painting on the wall, the fridge magnet that your daughter made, the clear blue sky outside, and the leafy green tree across the road.
  • 4 Things You Can Feel:  Once you’ve gotten in touch with five things you can see, then – while you continue breathing in through your nose, and out through your mouth – try to bring awareness to four things you can feel. For example, the chair that’s holding up your weight, your dress against your legs, the soft carpet beneath your feet, or a loose strand of hair brushing against your face.
  • 3 Things You Can Hear:  Next, bring awareness to three things you can hear. For example, the ticking of a clock, a bird chirping outside, or the sound of your children playing in their bedroom.
  • 2 Things You Can Smell:  Then, try to get in touch with two things you can smell. If you try but don’t find yourself able to smell anything, then try to summon up your two favorite smells. For example, the scent of freshly cut grass, or the aroma of a steaming mug of hot chocolate.
  • 1 Emotion You Can Feel:  Lastly, be mindful of one emotion you can feel.

Put all together, this 5-4-3-2-1 grounding exercise is really helpful for when you’re trapped in the “depression fog” and sinking deeper and deeper. It does this by getting you out of your head and in touch with your surroundings – thereby creating some separation between you and your racing thoughts and thus calming you down. Not only that, but it can be used as a preventative exercise too, for the purpose of helping you relax a little bit before something difficult – such as a job interview you’re really nervous about, or meeting someone who’s capable of triggering your depression or anxiety.

2.  Grounding Exercise with Picture Frames
If you find yourself somewhere, where you cannot do a full mindfulness exercise, this is a strategy that works almost anywhere. Find a picture on the wall, or any rectangular framed objects, such as a mirror. In school, and office, classroom, or home, you will usually be able to find something. Walk over to the framed picture. Look at the framed object, and note  the four corners.  While breathing in through your nose slowly, and out through your mouth slowly, mentally count the four corners of the picture. Keep repeating until you find yourself feeling calmer.

3.  Give yourself a timeout
When you’re trapped in the “depression fog”, it’s extremely helpful if you can calm yourself down and put a stop to your racing thoughts. As an alternative to a grounding exercise, another effective way of achieving this is through relaxing self-care practices – for example, by going for a walk, getting lost in your favorite video game, playing with your dog, taking a hot bubble bath, listening to your favorite playlist, reading a good book, watching your favorite series on Netflix, or doing anything else that mellows you out.

4.  Journaling
When you feel yourself suffocated by negative thoughts, worry, fear, or any other difficult emotions associated with “depression fog”, then another way of dealing with them is to try to “release” them. This is not only extremely cathartic – and therefore likely to calm you down – but also, when you have a healthy way to release your pent-up emotions, you’re also able to distance yourself from them, which makes it much easier for you to be able to gain clarity over those thoughts and be able to work through them.

A great way to do this is by journaling. Start with a pen and a blank piece of paper, take a few deep breaths, and then, just write what you feel (you could type your thoughts up on a computer as well, but using a pen and paper is generally recommended since it doesn’t come with distractions like Facebook and your email). Like I said, the process of writing down your thoughts is likely to relax you a little bit, and by “getting them out there” instead of keeping them trapped inside your head, you’ll find it easier to sort them out and gain some control over them.

Write down your thoughts without editing. It’s been shown to be very cathartic.

5.  Talk to an emotion buddy or coach
Just like journalling, talking to someone who you feel comfortable with and trust can also be really cathartic when you’re experiencing “depression fog”. Not only that, but someone you’re close with can also give you a new perspective on the thoughts or the situation that you’re struggling with. This can be particularly helpful, because when you’re in the midst of “depression fog”, your perspective is often negatively distorted, so talking with someone can often result in you seeing things in a more positive or less catastrophic light.  Find one or two trusted people you can talk to in times of trouble.

Black Mental Health

Black history month and psychology:

A quick look at research into disparities in need for services and access to mental health treatment.

1946
In the 1940s, psychologists Kenneth and Mamie Clark designed and conducted a series of experiments known colloquially as “the doll tests” to study the psychological effects of segregation on African-American children. Drs. Clark used four dolls, identical except for color, to test children’s racial perceptions. Their subjects, children between the ages of three to seven, were asked to identify both the race of the dolls and which color doll they prefer. A majority of the children, BOTH black and white, preferred the white doll and assigned positive characteristics to it. The Clarks concluded that “prejudice, discrimination, and segregation” created a feeling of inferiority among African-American children and damaged their self-esteem.  The findings were presented to the American Psychological Association about the crisis in mental health for Black children.

2016
In a study published in June 2016, in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Princeton doctoral graduate student Heather Kugelmass used voice actors to record phone messages for 320 New York City-based psychotherapists, each asking for a new patient appointment. The psychotherapists, all of whom had doctoral degrees and were selected from the directory of a large HMO, each received calls from one black middle-class and one white middle-class caller, or from one black working-class and one white working-class caller. Each caller mentioned symptoms of depression, mentioned that they were covered by the HMO health insurance plan, requested a weekday evening appointment, and asked the therapist to call back with possible appointment times. Kugelmass varied the names, wording and accents of the callers to suggest race and class. Overall, she found that 44 percent of the voice messages were returned, and that 15 percent elicited a clear appointment offer from the therapist.  Importantly, offer rates varied by race and class—the therapists offered appointments to 28 percent of white middle-class callers but only 17 percent of black middle-class ones. Among working-class callers, only 8 percent of both black and white appointment-seekers received offers.

Current status
According to the federal Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health, African Americans are 10% more likely to experience serious psychological distress.

However, only 30% of Black Americans are likely to seek any form of treatment, when experiencing significant psychiatric symptoms, compared to 45% of white Americans.  In 2017, suicide was the second leading cause of death for African Americans, ages 15 to 24.

Making treatment more affordable
The cost of treatment may be prohibitive for many, especially among those without insurance coverage. Many low-income individuals can find help in the community health system, but such systems may suffer from a lack of clinicians able to treat complex and less common conditions. It can be especially difficult to find care for those who lack any sort of insurance, have an unstable living situation, or who must contend with the inability to make appointments due to overcrowding.  Individual practices and treatment centers can help by publicizing effective low-cost treatment options (i.e., practicum students/interns, sliding-scale slots, etc.)

Increasing awareness of mental disorders and treatment options
Education about mental disorders and the treatment process is critical to reducing barriers to treatment among the African American community. Suggestions for overcoming this barrier include public education campaigns (e.g., mass media), educational presentations at community venues (e.g., black churches), and open information sessions at local mental health clinics. In fact, many black churches are taking the treatment to where the people are and hiring licensed therapists to work with their flock.

Transparency
For those who do start treatment, the first clinical encounter presents an important opportunity to address skepticism about the usefulness of mental health treatment. It’s the clinician’s responsibility to demystify the process and explain the benefits of staying the course. Without this knowledge, the participant may only assume what he or she may encounter and base their decision to follow through on incorrect assumptions. If the expected outcomes, number of sessions, and potential goals are clearly outlined in advance, there is lesser chances of feeling misled or not in control.

Making mental health a priority
Treatment has the potential to conflict with many daily activities or commitments for busy people. Many individuals take second and third jobs to make ends meet. Whether the individual feels treatment is a necessary priority despite prior engagements, transportation, or scheduling issues is an important positive step.

Including the family
Actively incorporating the family is another crucial measure in overcoming barriers to treatment. By gaining familial support, the client may start to lose the fear of being outcast or stigmatized. In addition, with the family’s acceptance, making time for treatment becomes easier and priorities may be put into perspective. Utilizing the family to emphasize the importance of good mental health creates more allies to emphasize the relationship between improved functioning and greater success at home, community, and work.

Reducing fears about therapy and stigma
Making psychotherapy less intimidating may be one of the most important ways of improving help-seeking. Careful use of language can help to reduce some discomfort surrounding mental health care. For example, many clients are more comfortable with the term “counseling” over “psychotherapy” (Thompson et al., 2004), and this should be considered in advertising and conversational exchanges. Another practical way to reduce fears is to offer free initial  assessments, screening/intakes, and phone consultations, which will help familiarize potential patients with the clinic, clinician, and treatment. Clinicians might use initial contacts to address fears of being involuntarily hospitalized by explaining the difference between typical mental health challenges and “being crazy,” which has often been brought up as a concern.

Provider Bias And Inequality Of Care
Conscious or unconscious bias from providers and lack of cultural competence result in misdiagnosis and poorer quality of care. Black Americans, especially women, are more likely to experience and mention physical symptoms related to mental health problems. For example, you may describe bodily aches and pains when talking about depression. A health care provider who is not culturally competent might not recognize these as symptoms of a mental health condition.

Statistics: NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness), 2017.

Dearest Loved One: A Letter About My Depression

Many people find it nearly impossible to talk about their depression, especially to their loved ones. I’ve found that for some of my patients, it helps to put it in writing. I’ve drafted this letter for anyone and everyone who thinks it might be useful. Customize and share as you wish.

Dearest (loved one),

It was hard for me to write this letter because avoidance comes more easily to me. I am writing this because you are somebody who is very important to me. I like to think that if you were going through a difficult time, you would feel free to talk to me openly, and feel listened to and supported.

I care about you so much and yet it’s really hard for me to talk about this to you. I am going through some very difficult times right now, and I want to help you understand why I might have been acting in ways that might not seem like me lately. I want to explain, and maybe ask you to support me in some helpful ways, if you would like to.

You may be wondering why I have not asked you to talk about this before. I’m writing instead of calling or speaking to you in person, because it’s a really difficult thing to talk about. It’s also not something I’m used to doing. Expressing myself in writing feels safer right now. One day I hope to be able to talk with you about my depression and anxiety, in the same way that we talk about every day stuff.

The big D, depression, is a daily struggle in my life. It’s hard for me to articulate what this illness feels like. It’s like having a fog between you and everything else in life. It’s like having a backpack full of rocks that you carry with you everywhere. It wears you down. It’s like walking through quicksand that no one else can see and hoping that today is not the day that you go under. Sometimes it’s one minute at a time.

It’s hard to talk about, because you tell me all of the beautiful things in my life I should be grateful for. How I have so much. I cannot argue, but it does not minimize the fact of the darkness.  I understand that your understanding of depression may not match my own experience. Also, because depression has a stigma and it’s not talked about much in our family, social circle, or in the world, it’s unfortunately common for people who have never been through it themselves to underestimate just how painful, difficult, and burdensome it can be.

The most important thing that I want you to understand is that suffering from depression is much more than having a bad day or feeling stressed out. A bad day is just that, a bad day, and for most people sadness may be a temporary emotion.

Depression can make people feel miserable for weeks and months, or even years at a time. It is exhausting. It can make people hate themselves and their life. Surviving can become the goal of the day and surpasses all other ambitions. It is a gut wrenching, torturous, and incredibly courageous thing to live with depression.

I also want you to know that depression is an illness. It’s to be taken very seriously, and not something where you can just pull yourself up by the bootstraps. It’s a complicated one, with no easy fix. There are literally hundreds of millions of people who suffer, often in silence.

Yes, every day I try to fight it, with all my tools. Some days I win and others not.

This letter may leave you feeling helpless. If you’d like to help, there are some things you can do. Although they may seem small, they are incredibly significant.

First, please don’t judge me. It’s hard enough to have to deal with it without feeling that I am  minimized for it. People who are depressed often feel extremely alone or abandoned. They feel incredibly vulnerable and exposed.  Second, just listen. It can be very cathartic to talk about what hurts.You have no idea how wonderful it feels to know that I can talk to you and vent without fear. Third, even when I don’t respond, and you text me or check in, it makes me feel cared for. Sometimes I don’t have the energy to respond right away. But I know that you are there. Last, it helps me if you remind me that it’s possible to overcome. Depression is an evil sorcerer that makes your brain think that this is all there is.

Without being fake, when you remind me that there is hope, that I have won the battle previously, there is light ahead, and that things will change, it makes me want to get help and keep on fighting.

Thank you, and I love that you were able to read this. It means more than I can say in words. Writing this letter makes conversations possible.

(Your name).

 

 

Embolden Psychology
Embolden

Embolden offers the ADOS-2, the gold standard assessment for kids on the spectrum.

Combined with psychoeducational testing, it helps provide comprehensive information and recommendations to help children and teens six and up.

Thank you for contacting us.