Tag Archives: Eastern Philosophy

Clinical Psychology + Eastern Philosophy + DEI = Mental Health

7 Eastern Concepts for Mental Health

SANGHA
Community of friends practicing together in order to encourage awareness and mindfulness. Buddhist writings state that the water from all the oceans has only one taste, salt. And for all humanity there is only one desire, freedom. This requires community as a practice.

METTA
An attitude of kindness and goodwill, wishing other people well with affection, but also realizing that true happiness is something that they ultimately will have to find for themselves. It’s fully loving another without being responsible for the other person‘s happiness. That doesn’t mean you don’t help them. It means you don’t own their stuff.

SAMSARA
Impermanence or state of flow. The idea that people are constantly in a process of development/ stages of life. The literal translation from Sanskrit is “a wandering through.” Where we are right now, the good or the bad, it’s not permanent. As the expression goes, the good news: nothing last forever; the bad news, nothing last forever.

DUKKHA
Existential suffering. That experiencing the pain of illness, aging, death, loss, abandonment, is part of the human experience. We are not individually cursed with misery. We are in this together. Empathy is required.

CETANA
Intention or volition. Intention determines whether an action is ethical. We are human and make errors. We may have good intentions (a desire to act) that do not pan out in a desired result/outcome. However, intention encompasses present action regardless of consequence and predicts future behavior. Intention matters.

SEVA
Compassion, service to others, giving without expectation of return, recognition, or glory.

KARMA
The most misunderstood of concepts, karma is not a vengeful creature looking to bring down people. It is an accumulation of all events and actions. It is the universal checking account of withdrawals and deposits. Sometimes we are in overdraft, because human, other times, we are earning interest.

Love, health, and peace to you and yours. 🙏🏽

Mantras as Self-Statements

Many people are familiar with the classic psychotherapy strategies of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), which include the use of self-statements to combat negative or intrusive thoughts and cognitive distortions (tricks the brain plays on you, particularly when depressed or anxious).

Personally and professionally, I like to integrate the ancient knowledge that comes from mantras as therapeutic work. A mantra is a repeated positive affirmation. It should reflect something positive you’re trying to invoke within you; anything that feels true when you speak it. I like mantras that begin with “I am” because they resonate deeply as truth. You end up speaking it into existence.

What is something you’re needing or wanting to create?
Your intention should come from your greatest place of self-compassion. Go into it without attachment. You may want your mantra to speak to a very specific desire that looks a certain way. But trust me when I say that when you arrive up on your mantra you will feel a sense of resonance.
It will just feel right.

When should we use mantras?
During meditation, walking, upon waking to set intention for the day, sitting in traffic, during a stressful day at work, to unwind at night, in the shower, and so many more possibilities. Verbalizing your mantra, speaking it aloud and repeating it, is powerful. Feel the vibration of the mantra on your lips pay attention as it reverberates through your body. Write it in your journal, on a post it, on an index card taped to your bathroom mirror.

I also use mantras with technology. Put it in your reminders, your Google calendar on repeat, Alexa, pop-ups, text it to yourself.

Some modern day mantras:
Awakening
“I ignite the many aspects of the goddess within me.”

Abundance
In Sanskrit: Om Shreem Maha Lakshmiyei Namaha, which translates to recognition of the potential for true abundance in all aspects of life.

Self-compassion and forgiveness
“I accept myself.”

Endurance/Strength
“This too shall pass.”

Love
“I am love.”

Calmness
“Smile, breathe, and go slowly.”

Being present
“Be here, now.”

Allowing the universe to guide you
“I am open to the universe.”

Happiness
“I choose joy.”

Release
“Close your eyes, clear your heart, let it go.”

Empowerment
“I are capable of wonderful things”

Embolden Psychology
Embolden

Embolden offers the ADOS-2, the gold standard assessment for kids on the spectrum.

Combined with psychoeducational testing, it helps provide comprehensive information and recommendations to help children and teens six and up.

Thank you for contacting us.