Tag Archives: simplicity challenge

Is simplicity significant?

Whether or not you call it minimalism, neuropsychological research indicates there are certainly mental health benefits to this type of lifestyle. Primarily, following a minimalist lifestyle emphasizes saving time, energy, and money, areas that are integral to mental health. Based on research from clinical psychology, minimalism has cognitive, social, and emotional benefits.

Allows you to self reflect
Overcommitment creates a frenetic pace. Time to sit and think is rare. Making time for meditation, prayer, and breath work/pranayama forces our brains to slow down in a way that is often not possible during the rest of our busy lives.

Encourages solitary time
Neuropsychological research shows that solitude has a number of benefits including increased feelings of creativity, introspection, agency, and even spirituality. Decreasing our social commitments and social media time is often difficult but actually provides a brain boost.

Reduces decision fatigue
Over 35,000 times. That’s the current cognitive research estimate on how many decisions we are required to make each day. And, if true, that comes out to 2000 decisions per hour or one decision to be made every two seconds. Overthinking is not just a phrase, it’s reality.

Supports executive brain functioning(such as organizing, planning, prioritizing, and self monitoring).
Simplifying life can help assist with productivity. Everything from meal prep, giving away items that are not used, going through your closet, not scrolling endlessly, and removing unnecessary events and tasks from your calendar all support your frontal lobe abilities.

Also see my post on simplified daily rituals that matter.

 

Embolden Psychology
Embolden

Embolden offers the ADOS-2, the gold standard assessment for kids on the spectrum.

Combined with psychoeducational testing, it helps provide comprehensive information and recommendations to help children and teens six and up.

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