Tag Archives: suicide awareness

Suicide prevention month

September is suicide prevention month.

That doesn’t just mean check on your friends. Although that is important.
It means:
promote universal healthcare. Because most people cannot afford mental health.

  • it means understanding that suicide is the third most likely cause of death, for ages 15 to 45, universally.
  • it means understanding that the pandemic has caused depression and despair to grow exponentially, combined with financial hardship, lack of mental health and medical care, and social isolation.
  • It means destigmatizing mental disorders.
  • It requires an active stance. Because it’s not going away, and eventually it will be in your face, from friends, family, colleagues, and loved ones. Even people who attempt suicide and survive, often have residual grave harm to their psyche and body. This is a public health issue.

Suicide Prevention Hotline
Additional Resources from the CDC

How to help a loved one who is having mental health problems

We all go through tough times and people help us through them. Other times we have been worried about other people’s mental health. Whether they are a friend, family member, significant other, neighbor, or colleague, there are many ways to support somebody you care about.

1 in 6 people experienced a common mental health problem such as anxiety or depression in the past week.

Talking about mental health
If you are worried about someone it can be difficult to know what to do. When you are aware there is an issue, it is important not to wait. One of the saddest components of depression is that it is immobilizing. You can simultaneously know that you desperately need help, and have absolutely no energy or desire to seek it.

Waiting and hoping others will come to you for help might lose valuable time in getting them support. Openly talking with someone is often the first step to take when you know they are going through a hard time. This way you can find out what is troubling them and what you can do to help.

Eight tips for talking about mental health:

  1. Set time aside with no distractions. It is important to provide an open and non-judgemental space.
  2. Let them share as much or as little as they want to. Let them lead the discussion at their own pace. Don’t put pressure on them to tell you anything they aren’t ready to talk about. Talking can take a lot of trust and courage. You might be the first person they have been able to talk to about this.
  3. Don’t try to diagnose or second guess their feelings. You probably aren’t a medical expert and, while you may be happy to talk and offer support, you aren’t a trained counsellor. Try not to make assumptions about what is wrong or jump in too quickly with your own diagnosis or solutions.
  4. Keep questions open ended. Say “Why don’t you tell me how you are feeling?” rather than “I can see you are feeling very low”. Try to keep your language neutral. Give the person time to answer and try not to grill them with too many questions.
  5. Talk about wellbeing. Exercise, having a healthy diet and taking a break can help protect mental health and sustain wellbeing. Talk about ways of de-stressing and ask if they find anything helpful.
  6. Listen carefully to what they tell you. Repeat what they have said back to them to ensure you have understood it. You don’t have to agree with what they are saying, but by showing you understand how they feel, you are letting them know you respect their feelings.
  7. Offer them help in seeking professional support and provide information on ways to do this.
  8. Know your limits. If you believe they are in immediate danger or they have incurred injuries that need medical attention, you need to take action to make sure they are safe. More details on dealing in a crisis can be found below.

How do I respond in a crisis?

People with mental health problems sometimes experience a crisis, such as breaking down in tears, having a panic attack, feeling suicidal, or experiencing a different sense of reality (dissociation). This may include even losing a sense of time and place. You may feel a sense of crisis too, in response, but it’s important to stay calm yourself.

There are some general strategies that you can use to help:

    • Listen without making judgements and concentrate on their needs in that moment.
    • Ask them what would help them.
    • Reassure and help point them to practical information or resources.
    • Avoid confrontation.
    • Ask if there is someone they would like you to contact.
    • Encourage them to seek appropriate professional help.
    • If they have hurt themselves, make sure they get the first aid they need.

Seeing, hearing or believing things that no-one else does can be the symptom of a mental health problem. It can be frightening and upsetting. Gently remind the person who you are and why you are there. Under extreme stress, people can dissociate. Don’t reinforce or dismiss their experiences, but acknowledge how the symptoms are making them feel.

How do I respond if someone is suicidal?
If someone tells you they are feeling suicidal or can’t go on, or if you suspect they are thinking of taking their own life, it is very important to encourage them to get help.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
Hours: Available 24 hours. Languages: English and Spanish
1-800-273-8255

Scattering CJ: A New Documentary on Mental Health Awareness

This weekend is the world premiere of Scattering CJ, an important new documentary on mental health and suicide awareness, scheduled to coincide with National Suicide Prevention Week and Suicide Awareness Month.

It’s heartwarming to see this important topic get a bit more attention. Speaking of which,  The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention did a feature on the film and the filmmakers Andrea Kalin and David Lobatto,

Could you tell us about your documentary “Scattering CJ”? What is it about, and what initially interested you in telling this story?

“Scattering CJ” follows the amazing story of Hallie Twomey, a heartbroken mom from Maine who lost her elder son CJ to suicide in 2010. To honor CJ’s memory and his love of travel, Hallie put a request out on social media for help in scattering his ashes in as many places of beauty and meaning as possible.

Hallie’s request resonated beyond her wildest dreams, fostering a worldwide community across social media that was galvanized to scatter CJ’s ashes in a thousand different locations, and accompanied by a vast array of stunning imagery and moving testimony. The “Scattering CJ” initiative raised awareness about suicide, and encouraged support among the many people following the project, many of whom had been affected by suicide or struggled themselves.

The overwhelming response Hallie received from strangers from around the globe has been a massive part of her family’s healing journey.

Our belief in this inspiring, profoundly moving story’s capacity for positive social change — and its need to be seen by the widest audience possible — is what has driven us in making this film.

In what ways has your understanding of mental health and suicide changed or been impacted by your working on the film? Did anything surprise you?

We went into this with some intellectual understanding of suicide, and we’d seen the statistics. What those numbers don’t reveal, and what making the film has laid bare to us, is that for every one person who takes their own life there are countless others who are seismically affected by that action and the subsequent absence of that person in their lives. This effect needs a spotlight as much as the death itself, because loss is often a trauma with lifelong repercussions. An unpleasant but eye-opening surprise for us was the number of people involved in the making of the film and its outreach who have lost someone close to them to suicide. It seems that everyone knows someone affected.

Read more here

Scattering CJ (Extended Trailer) from Spark Media on Vimeo.

Embolden Psychology
Embolden

Embolden offers the ADOS-2, the gold standard assessment for kids on the spectrum.

Combined with psychoeducational testing, it helps provide comprehensive information and recommendations to help children and teens six and up.

Thank you for contacting us.