The psychology behind journaling

”I am the subject I know best.” -Frida Kahlo
From a scientific standpoint, there is surprising evidence that supports cognitive, emotional, and even physical benefits from journaling. Psychologist and expressive writing expert, Dr. James Pennebaker conducted numerous studies that concluded journaling can actually strengthen immunity, decrease blood pressure, reduce stress,  diminish anxiety, lower depression, facilitate sleeping habits, and even accelerate the body’s ability to heal wounds. Also see my post on mindful writing.

There are even more benefits to the daily practice of journaling. Dr. Maud Purcell, psychotherapist and expert on journaling, concluded that writing accesses the left hemisphere of the brain, which is analytical and rational. While your left brain is occupied, your right brain is free to do what it does best, i.e. create, intuit and feel. In this way, writing removes mental blocks and allows us to use more of our inherent brainpower to better understand ourselves and the world around us. In short, journaling is intrinsically linked to the psychological process, allowing for greater insight and understanding of our self. Done on a daily basis, it clears the way for the day.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Embolden Psychology
Embolden

Embolden offers the ADOS-2, the gold standard assessment for kids on the spectrum.

Combined with psychoeducational testing, it helps provide comprehensive information and recommendations to help children and teens six and up.

Thank you for contacting us.